Sunday, December 11, 2011

They See What You Don't See

I'm sending a novel pitch out to agents, and one responds with interest.  This means it's time to send a full proposal:  synopsis, character sketches, sample chapters, author bio.

Years ago, I forged ahead with confidence and zeal, believing I was hot stuff.  I didn't need anyone to tell me how to revise or improve my writing.  I was young and smart and perfect and error-free.  Now, after a decade of rejection after rejection, I've realized the beauty of humble living.   I've realized the danger of an independent spirit that--when left alone and unchecked--makes a person believe they are better and more important than they are.

This time (older, wiser, realistic), I send my chapters to neighbors who respond with the most insightful and clear revision suggestions.  The Local Artist, for example, sees what I don't see:  unclear sentences, confusing details, unrealistic scenes, clich├ęs.  Her commentary rids the prose of excess and turns each sentence towards its best position.

I want her to now edit my life.  Living with flair means abandoning my independent spirit so others can suggest and revise.  They see what I don't see. 

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It's hard to let others see your work and your life, offering it up for revision and commentary.  Have you had good experiences when you allow others to "edit" you? 

4 comments:

Phillip Bishop said...

Amen, and Amen!!

Live with Flair said...

And one more Amen!!

Italian Mama said...

BTW, the Local Artist has edited and offered commentary on some of my work as well, and it is clear she sees with the eyes of an artist:  different from the rest of us.  How lucky we are to know her!

Live with Flair said...

Agreed!